• MitziAndMaud

45 Great North Road, Barnet EN5 1EJ - on the corner of Cherry Hill


As part of the National Garden Scheme which raises money for charity, this beautiful garden which is the pride and joy of owners Miriam & Ron Raymond will be open to the public on Sunday 31st July from 1:30-5:30pm, and again on Sunday 7th August.


The garden is a riot of colour with lots of pockets of interest and some real show stoppers.


There are light refreshments available, partial wheelchair access, dogs are welcome - there is a “fun trail” for children with small prizes and even a plant sale


Entrance fee for adults is £3 and children are free.




Please come along and enjoy a wonderful afternoon whilst supporting a good cause!





 

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Frost can affect numerous plants, and it is particularly damaging to tender new growth and blossom in the spring. Newly planted, young plants can be more susceptible to frost damage than fully established specimens.

It’s better to be safe than sorry, so remember to check the weather forecasts for frost alerts and take steps to protect your favourite flowers and crops. In particular there is a severe weather warning issued by the Met Office from tonight, 31 Mar 2022 for the next few days.


There are many quick ways to protect your plants from frost, and you can enhance the protection you provide your plants by insulating greenhouses and cold frames. You can use a cloche to protect seedlings, or provide other tender plants with a fleece or hessian wrapping.


 

Here are some easy ways to help reduce the risk of frost damage and protect the plants in your garden.

  • Cover plants with a double layer of horticultural fleece or other suitable protection, like hessian, when a frost is forecast

  • Mulch the root area of conifers, evergreens, tender perennials and tender shrubs with a thick layer of organic matter to prevent the ground becoming frozen

  • Move container grown plants to a sheltered part of your garden in colder weather and consider providing some extra protection by wrapping the pot - bubble wrap works well

  • Leave the previous seasons’ growth on more tender plants until spring, for example Penstemon as this provides valuable frost protection during the winter

  • Tender plants can be lifted or moved to a more sheltered position or ideally, into a greenhouse. Of course, if this is not practical for you, then protect them by wrapping [examples include bananas and tree ferns]

  • Lift tender perennials such as dahlias, cannas, pelargoniums and fuchsias before the first frosts

  • Protect fruit and strawberries from frost by packing with bracken or straw

  • Plants exposed to early morning sun may thaw too rapidly after a frost, causing damage to flowers and young growth. Camellia and magnolia flowers in particular can be ruined by a single frost

  • Plant tender bedding plants out after the danger of frost has passed; this is generally late May in the south of England and June elsewhere. Always harden off plants before planting outside. I do already have these for sale on my web site, but they are sold with the caveat that it's too early for them to go out just yet!

  • Ensure tender plants are overwintered safely in the greenhouse by providing adequate heating or insulation


 

Cold Frame


Young hardy plants, including autumn-sown hardy annuals, hardy shrub cuttings and seed-raised perennials, will benefit from the shelter of a cold frame over winter. Open the lid on warm days to prevent overheating and deter fungal diseases.


 

Cloche


Giving winter crops protection from the worst frost and wind can make all the difference to their survival, and it may even allow small harvests. Use cloches to protect crops such as broad beans, curled parsley, hardy lettuces peas, salad leaves, spinach and Swiss chard. The photo above shows some traditional glass ones, but there are many DIY versions if you google on the internet you can create the same effect using some simple things that you may have laying around at home.


 

Bring Inside


A frost-free greenhouse is invaluable for wide range of plants. Insulate it with bubble wrap to retain heat and bring inside plants such as these: aeoniums, agapanthus, citrus echeverias, pelargoniums and salvias – you could also use a conservatory or porch if you don’t have a greenhouse.


 

Tender Palms


Protect palms by tying in the leaves to protect the growing point. In cold regions this can be loosely packed with straw for extra insulation.


 

Citrus Trees


With their evergreen leaves, fragrant flowers and delicious fruit, citrus, such as oranges, lemons, grapefruits and limes are so popular, but as our weather here in the UK gets so cold in Winters, and through the Spring months too, the frost can threaten these tender plants.


When a freeze is predicted, (tonight! 31/3/22) check to see if the soil around your citrus is damp or needs watering; trees that are water-stressed will freeze more quickly. Moist soil will also absorb and hold heat from the sun more effectively than dry soil. Removing mulch from the base of the tree, either temporarily or for the entire winter, will expose the soil to the sun so it can radiate heat back to the plant at night.


Covering citrus—especially young plants—with a shelter during very cold weather helps slow down heat loss, often enough to save the tree. Use fleece or hessian, wrapping the trunk too.


 

I hope this short guide will be useful to you, watch out for more blogs from Mitzi and Maud - please follow us on social media and have browse in our web shop if you are looking for plants and compost for your garden or allotment, we offer free delivery within M25 area for all orders over £50. A link to our web site is below.




www.mitziandmaud.co.uk


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Once again this year we are selling Christmas Trees and thought you might like to hear about our supplier. We buy our Premium Nordman Fir trees direct from the person who plants the trees - so that we know the journey the trees have been on and so that we can be confident that we are sourcing responsibly.


The trees are cultivated here in the UK using environmentally friendly methods founded on the principles of sustainability and the standards of integrated production.

By their very nature, the trees play a valuable role in mitigating climate change, by generating oxygen and capturing carbon dioxide during their growth years, while enriching the soil through biodegradation after the festive period.


The process begins with selection of the right seeds, which Nordmann Classic sources from their native Caucasian homeland and then – under constant supervision and with genuine tender loving care – cultivates into small and delicate saplings. After two or three years, the saplings are then transferred to the plantation, where they grow into beautiful Nordmann Classic firs.


Sensitivity to nature and sustainability are key principles that guide our great passion and sincerely felt responsibility for the environment. For a long time now, the company we buy from has been planting more trees than it sells, one of its fundamental corporate policies being to create a sound ecological and economic balance.

The trees we supply you with are cultivated using environmentally friendly methods founded on the principles of sustainability and the standards of integrated production.

The most important factors when it comes to guaranteeing the quality of the products we sell you are care and experience. Along the entire value chain – from the seeds through to delivery of perfect trees – they constantly strive to optimise all aspects of propagation, production, logistics, etc.

We hope that you will buy your Christmas Tree from us this year - we are offering free delivery across London and the home counties & where possible we will deliver on the date you choose.


This year we launched our RENT A CHRISTMAS TREE scheme. These pot grown trees are supplied and then collected in January. This scheme has been very popular this year as the environment is at the top all out hearts and minds and at present we do not have any more trees for rent or pot grown trees to buy. Our trees really are pot grown rather than plunged which is the case with so many trees on the market. We offered three sizes available which are a beautiful shape!


We are really delighted to be supporting some local good causes with our scheme this year - encouraging local families to buy their tree through our scheme. For each tree purchased using out coupon codes, we will donate £5 to that organisation. So far the charities / schools which have signed up are Foulds School, Barnet [who participated last year too], Christchurch School, Barnet, Cherry Lodge Cancer Care and Chcickenshed Theatre in Barnet.


Please have a browse in our webshop - we sell everything you would normally find in a Garden Centre! - https://www.mitziandmaud.co.uk/gardencentre


Alternatively please message by email mitziandmaud@aol.com Or contact us via

Twitter https://twitter.com/mitziandmaud

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Mitzi-Maud-853138091499344

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mitziandmaud/


You can see our recent reviews here: https://www.mitziandmaud.co.uk/reviews-1


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